Get started with InfluxDB and Python on Linux

If you are building a script, application or anything else that collects measurements or data over time intervals, a time-series database might be a good match for you. In a TSDB you simply store the data and read it back for analysis. For these use cases, there is no need for updates or changes to the data as it’s time-based. The data can’t change back in the past. InfluxDB is the most popular of these time-series databases and this article describes how to get started with it, on Debian or Ubuntu, and how to use it from Python.

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Setup a redundant PostgreSQL database with repmgr and pgpool

Using a database to store information is┬ávery common. The more information gets stored in a database, the more critical it becomes. At a certain point, the need for a redundant, high(er) available database-setup raises. When you’re using PostgreSQL, you can setup streaming replication quite easily in order to have your data redundant on two or more nodes. But wouldn’t it be a shame if you wouldn’t use the copies of your data to balance the load of your primary┬ádatabase-server? In this post, I’ll try to explain how to setup a redundant PostgreSQL database with load balancing.

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Execute queries on a Microsoft SQL server from the Linux CLI with ODBC and Kerberos authentication

A while ago, the Windows-world and the Linux-world were not the best friends in communicating with each other. Especially not when it came to proprietary stuff like Microsoft SQL server. in contrast to everybody’s expectations, somewhere end 2011, beginning 2012, Microsoft released an ODBC driver for SQL server for Linux. This driver allows executing queries from a Linux machine to a Microsoft SQL Server database. The driver can be used in combination with Kerberos tickets and AD authentication to execute queries.

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